Taiwanese Sesame Noodles (麻醬麵)

Sesame Noodles, or Ma Jiang Mian (麻醬麵): a humble yet elegant Taiwanese classic. Simple and flavorful — quite the perfect meatless weeknight meal.

This recipe pays homage to Din Tai Fung (鼎泰豐), a now world-renowned Taiwanese restaurant. I practically grew up on their Ma Jiang Mian (麻醬麵) so to me, theirs is how it should taste. As such, I tried my best to replicate those flavors. It’s so simple yet so complex — nutty, fragrant, with a subtle tang and unexpected zing.

These noodles take only 10 minutes to make, but the flavor you get is really out of this world. It’s quite the perfect meatless weeknight meal.


Taiwanese Sesame Noodles (麻醬麵)

4 from 40 votes
Recipe by George L. Course: LunchCuisine: TaiwaneseDifficulty: Easy
Servings

2

servings
Prep time

5

minutes
Cooking time

5

minutes

Sesame Noodles, or Ma Jiang Mian (麻醬麵): a humble yet elegant Taiwanese classic. Simple and flavorful — quite the perfect meatless weeknight meal.

Ingredients

  • 400 grams fresh wheat noodles

  • 2 tablespoons Chinese/Taiwanese sesame paste (Zhi Ma Jiang)

  • 2 tablespoons light soy sauce

  • 2 tablespoons dark soy sauce

  • 1/2 teaspoon Chinese black vinegar (or rice vinegar)

  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

  • 2 teaspoons sugar

  • 1 teaspoon chili oil (optional)

  • 1 teaspoon mushroom bouillon (optional)

  • 1/3 cup (80 g) hot water (from cooking noodles)

  • 1 pinch salt, to taste

  • Toppings
  • 1 scallion, finely chopped

  • 30 grams roasted peanuts, crushed

Directions

  • Prepare Sesame Sauce. In a bowl, combine sesame paste, light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, black vinegar, toasted sesame oil, sugar, mushroom bouillon (optional), and chili oil (optional).
  • Prepare Noodles. Cook noodles according to package instructions. Drain noodles and reserve the hot (starchy) cooking water.
  • To Finish. Add a desired amount of the hot cooking water to the sesame sauce. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt. To assemble, place noodles in a bowl, ladle in the sauce, and garnish with scallions & crushed peanuts. Mix while still hot and enjoy.

Notes

  • Sesame Paste. Chinese/Taiwanese Sesame paste (Zhi Ma Jiang) gives the distinct flavor of the dish. Its flavor profile is very different from tahini: tahini is made from unroasted & hulled sesame seeds, while Chinese/Taiwanese sesame paste is made from roasted & unhulled sesame seeds. Substitutes: 1) one-to-one ratio of tahini & peanut butter. 2) replace all with peanut butter.
  • Note that this dish, as well as the version in Din Tai Fung, is usually made from chicken stock/soup. In most cases, vegan options are available upon request. For this vegan version, you can add mushroom bouillon to achieve the same umami flavor. Alternatively, use a brand of chili oil that packs some umami (note that my homemade chili oil gets its umami from MSG).
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Fallywho
Fallywho
8 months ago

Can’t wait to make these noodles. There are a few items I’m missing which I plan to buy tomorrow and then i’ll make these yummy looking noodles and the fish fragrant eggplant. I’m in the middle of a major Reno which includes the kitchen so I haven’t been cooking much. I look at your recipes with dreamy, sad, eyes and visions of your dishes in front of me.

Last edited 8 months ago by Fallywho
Andrew
Andrew
8 months ago

Simple to make and delicious! I used peanut butter this time, but I’m excited to try with the sesame paste once I get to the Asian grocery store again.

Jonelle
Jonelle
8 months ago

Made this for dinner tonight and it’s so simple but so flavorful and amazing. Thank you!

svsiecooks
svsiecooks
8 months ago

Is it okay to use tahini instead of Chinese sesame paste? Or is the sesame paste an absolute non-negotiable?

Jamie
Jamie
8 months ago

Made this for dinner tonight. It was super quick, super simple, and most importantly, super tasty – the ultimate comfort food! Please never stop posting recipes, I’ve fooled everyone in to thinking I’m a good chef with all of your dishes!

Rebeca
Rebeca
8 months ago

I did this for lunch! It was amazing and the best was that it took me like 10 minutes to make it lol

Constance
7 months ago

Incredible recipe! The taste is just right, exactly like the ma jiang mian I used to eat in Taiwan.

boneless_lentil
boneless_lentil
7 months ago

It’s like this article was hand written for me. I went vegan and have been desperate to recreate specifically din tai fung’s version of these noodles. Can’t wait to try! Thank you